11.27.2006

Stitch School: Cross Stitch

Stitch School has moved to it's very own space on the web! You'll now find the Cross Stitch post here. Comments are now closed on this post; if you'd like to leave a comment please do so on the new one.

16 comments:

Michele Annette said...

Thanks for the pattern, it looks beautiful! I used to do a lot of cross stitch in college, when I had a bit more free time. Ha! This pattern looks like it would make a nice tea towel. Thinking of more Christmas ideas! I love the last post about your kitties too!

'Tart said...

Thank you so much! I really enjoyed this post of stitching school. I do have a question about using linen vs. aida ~ How do you know how big to make the stitch if you do not have the aida holes? I am afraid to have uneven stitches without my aida. I have some beautiful patterns from an older cross stitch magazine and they show it on linen and I am afraid to try. Thanks again.

Jennifer said...

I am so very grateful for your stitch school. Your instructions are wonderful. I really appreciate you taking the time to share your knowledge.

janet said...

Good question 'Tart. Linen and heavy cotton both have holes—or, more accurately, space between the threads. After you decide how big you want your cross to be (and that's purely personal preference), you'll have to count across the threads for each stitch. As long as you stay in the same "row" when starting and ending each stitch you should be fine. And it gets easier after the first row because you have a starting place for the next one.

Aida is definitely easier to work with because the holes are more visible. My eyes may be a bit older than yours so I usually use a magnifying glass—one of those that you wear around your neck. It helps a lot when working with linen.

June said...

I've not been online for a few weeks and am just now catching up. Thanks so much for the two new stitch school tutorials as well as the cross-stitch pattern.

janet said...

Welcome back, June. I wondered about you when you didn't comment because you always do :)

Anonymous said...

it quite hard but following the instructions you eventuelly get there. thank you for putting a demonstration for how doing it.

Anonymous said...

hello thank you very much i cant descibe it how much leanring this means to me.
yours sk

Anonymous said...

I'm trying to make a stuffed animal mascot for my friend but the directions say to overlock stitch it together and i don't know what that is. Could you help me out? And does it make any difference if the material is felt?

janet said...

Overlock stitch isn't really an embroidery stitch - it's a sewing machine one. But, if you want to join two pieces together you can always try blanket stitch. If you check my post about that stitch, I showed a picture of a felt ornament that had the edges blanket-stitched together.

Felt is a nice heavy fabric that's often used for toys since it's soft and durable, but you could probably substitute another fabric and stuff it with more of whatever you're putting inside. Stuffed toys shouldn't be too soft so you'll need to compensate inside if you're using something softer outside.

Donna said...

I am a long time quilter, first time sross stitcher :)
I am still in practice mode and this question may be very basic.
When I have completed my row of corss stitches, I can still see glimpses of the aida cloth.
Am I doing something wrong?
I have tried doing the stitches with a much looser tension, but I still see the aida cloth through them.
I am using 2 strands of DMC cotton.
Thank you for your help (goodness knows I need it).
Kind regards
Donna

janet said...

No Donna, you're not doing anything wrong. The problem I have with Aida cloth is that you usually can still see it peeking through underneath - and it's not that attractive. Try increasing the number of strands you're using from two to three (or even four) or try not skipping holes for a denser look. I have examples in the photos of it done both ways and you can really see the difference.

Liz said...

Very useful!

suzana.ferreira said...

Hi, I'm brazilien and I don't know much english, but I want you to know how I love yours lessons. Many thanks. Kisses. Suzana

Lindsay said...

Thank you very much for your detailed instructions on all the different stitches. I'm in school still and this has been very helpful for my GCSE textiles work. Thanks again!

Tanya said...

Thanks so much for such a wonderful sight on embroidery stitches. You just saved all the people who are getting xmas presents from me. Your stitch photos and explanations are so clear. I tried numerous other sights but yours definitely is the best.

Tanya